Crew Neck vs Round Neck: An Overall Guideline

When we are buying T-shirts for ourselves, there’s a lot we consider. The design is the most important factor, of course; we usually buy a T-shirt because we like the color or the design on it, or because it has the logo of a renowned brand.

Sometimes, we buy a T-shirt because it is soft and comfortable, and we want something snug to sleep in. Some of the T-shirts we own become very dear to us; we wear them even after they’ve worn out and become discolored, just because we have grown accustomed to how familiar they feel to us. 

Very rarely, there are some buyers are particular about other factors, such as the neckline, hem or the shape. 

There are a lot of factors that help buyers choose a T-shirt for themselves, but the same also applies to sellers as well. 

When you are the seller, selling T-shirts with your own design printed on them, you’d still have to make a few decisions regarding the T-shirts. Apart from the fabric, the thread count, the size and shape, you’ll have to decide on the neckline. 

Types of Neckline in T-shirts

With shirts, sweaters, jumpers and jerseys, there are a number of necklines to choose from. Crew-neck and round-necks are just two of the most popular ones, apart from V-necks, 

collar-necks, boat-necks and crawl-necks in T-shirts. These neckline designs are popular among both men, women and children. 

At first glance, both the crew-neck and the round-neck T-shirts might look the same, but they are different in multiple ways. It’s not just a matter of preference to buyers, but both these necklines have their own advantages and importances.

From the seller’s point of view, too, the difference between these necklines should be given a thought before you are ordering T-shirts in bulk. 

However, before that, the seller needs to know the difference between round-neck T-shirts and crew-neck T-shirts. 

What are Crewnecks? 

The Crew-neck T-shirts are one of the oldest neck designs that came into existence almost the same time as T-shirts did.

The first T-shirts were worn under clothes to soak up the sweat, not on the outside for showing off. Crewnecks are the kind of round collars that fit your neck very closely, with just enough space for your neck to be comfortable. 

Crew-neck T-shirts are perfect for layering, usually worn under a shirt or sweater. They are more fitting for your body instead of hanging loose, but you can wear them by themselves, or layer them with other clothes.  

A crew neck is a snug fit, sometimes added separately to the T-shirt after the whole thing has been completed. Many people prefer crewnecks to other necklines as they are more adaptable.

You can wear them by themselves in the summer, and layer them with a shirt or a pullover when the weather starts to get chilly. 

What are Round necks? 

The round neck T-shirts are looser than crewnecks; they don’t fit your neck snugly but stay loose beneath your neck. There is a significant amount of skin showing between the neckline of your T-shirt and the base of your neck.

Generally, women wore bigger necklines than men, but with men, round necklines usually accompany loose T-shirts that are casually worn. 

When layered with other clothes, the loose round-necked T-shirts are often paired with a shirt, mostly with the buttons kept open. They are often loose enough to be worn by themselves, but these T-shirts can also be worn under sweaters and pullovers. 

Theoretically, all crew-necks are round, but not all round-necks can be called crew-necks. Round-necked T-shirts can be categorized as T-shirts with loose round necklines, but the crew-neck T-shirts are special because they are tightly fitted around your neck. , 

Crew-Necks vs. Round-Necks: Which One is Better? 

As the buyer, anyone can choose any type of neckline in their T-shirts, whatever they feel most comfortable in. Not many people pay much attention to the neckline of their T-shirt; they make their decisions based on the design, color and brand of the T-shirt. 

However, as a seller, this can be a big decision. When you are ordering T-shirts in bulk, you need to be mindful of the neckline, too. Because, if you end up with a neckline no one wants to buy, it will most certainly mean a huge financial loss for you. 

The neckline of your T-shirts would somewhat depend on your design. A crew-necked T-shirt certainly has more space than a round-necked T-shirt, but just barely.

No design on T-shirts are so big or so detailed that it would utilize the small portion around the neck of your T-shirt. So, the size of the design is hardly something to consider while choosing a neckline. 

There’s, however, another way to look at the problem. Crew-neck T-shirts are worn by themselves, but they are mostly worn as layers under shirts, polo T-shirts, jumpers, pullovers and sweaters.

Only a few men and women have the kind of figure where they can wear a crew cut by themselves, as these t-shirts are snug and tight-fitting. 

If you are selling-shirts with your patented design on them, you wouldn’t want your design to be hidden under layers of other clothing, would you?

The  T-shirts that people buy for the design are usually loose T-shirts with a round-neck that they can show off, flaunt off and parade in.

Buyers choose the size of the T-shirt according to what they are most comfortable wearing: something that perfectly fits them, or something that is loose and hangs off their bodies, or a T-shirt that is obviously oversized and loose.

When they want a T-shirt to wear in the summer, by itself, it usually has a round-neck and a design that’s meaningful or relatable. 

So, if you are the seller who prints their own design on T-shirts to sell them, the safest bet for you would be to make them on round-neck T-shirts.

This way, you can be sure your customers are buying your T-shirts because they like the design and that they are going to wear the T-shirts by themselves to show off the design, and possibly spread the name of your company. 

Alex John
 

This is Alex, I have been in tshirt business for the last eight years. This is my blog where I share my work and guidelines for fellows. Keep reading resources from here and I am open to any question.

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